idontusecalendars

17,169 notes

giddytf2:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

The power of doors.

giddytf2:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

The power of doors.

(via marinashutup)

26 notes

aconnormanning:

Don’t click it. Just don’t click the trend. Don’t fucking click it.
*clicks it*
OH FOR FUCK’S SAKE

*clicked it*
WOW. So from what I saw, a lot of these women are against feminism because they believe in things like equality for all, not being judged for or held back from  their personal life choices, you know things that I’m pretty sure all those dirty feminists actually stand for… Don’t get me wrong, I am all for people standing up for what they believe in, even if we disagree — Nothing gets done without talking about it and respectful discussions about differing opinions are freaking fantastic! But seriously, before you go labeling yourself as “against” anything, before you set off trying to purposefully discredit an entire group of people passionate about their cause, you should probably make sure you firmly understand what the opposing group is all about. 

Basically, IMHO what I know of feminism is super rad and if we as the internet could hold off on the hate for a hot second and just talk about it, I think more people might see that.
Cool? Cool.

aconnormanning:

Don’t click it. Just don’t click the trend. Don’t fucking click it.

*clicks it*

OH FOR FUCK’S SAKE

*clicked it*

WOW. So from what I saw, a lot of these women are against feminism because they believe in things like equality for all, not being judged for or held back from  their personal life choices, you know things that I’m pretty sure all those dirty feminists actually stand for… Don’t get me wrong, I am all for people standing up for what they believe in, even if we disagree — Nothing gets done without talking about it and respectful discussions about differing opinions are freaking fantastic! But seriously, before you go labeling yourself as “against” anything, before you set off trying to purposefully discredit an entire group of people passionate about their cause, you should probably make sure you firmly understand what the opposing group is all about. 

Basically, IMHO what I know of feminism is super rad and if we as the internet could hold off on the hate for a hot second and just talk about it, I think more people might see that.

Cool? Cool.

Filed under feminism women against feminism do your research